Wednesday, August 6, 2008

Can I see your ID, please?


From time to time, we receive questions on whether the OLCC requires anyone buying or being served alcohol to have a valid ID on them.

The OLCC requires licensees to check ID of anyone who reasonably appears 26 years old or younger.

An establishment might have a restriction on their liquor license due to a history of serving alcohol to minors or allowing minors in prohibited areas. In this case, it could be that a licensed business is required to check the ID of every person entering the establishment or being sold/served alcoholic beverages.

Or, a business can choose to have a stricter ID policy than what the state requires.

If you’re at a restaurant with your underage friend or relative, you might not be served - even if you have the ID to show you’re of age. Some businesses will refuse service if they suspect that you might furnish the alcoholic beverage to a minor at your table.

Current accepted forms of ID include a valid state driver license with a photo; a valid DMV ID card with photo, name, date of birth & physical description from any state; a valid passport or a valid U.S. military ID card.

If you don’t have your ID on you, the business may allow you to fill out a Statement of Age card. In order to do this, you must have at least two forms of identification on you. One with your name, address, date of birth, signature and physical description or photo. The second piece of ID must be able to verify the identity of the first piece. If it is still unclear if you are over 21 years of age, you will be refused service of alcoholic beverages.

73 comments:

  1. Given most of these places are private businesses, they can pretty much ask you to do just about any darn thing they want before they serve you anything from a beer to a hot dog.

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  2. I got booted from the Bagdad because I couldn't show this person, Joy, I believe her name was, my ID. I forgot my wallet and my friend was buying for the night. We only ordered food. She pulled a lot of weird rules out of her behind, like something about being "required to show ID" when asked. Of course, she was an expert, having taken the OLCC training seven times. I may not agree with all the OLCC rules, but it would at least be nice if businesses and their employees knew the law and didn't make stuff up for fear of getting cited or whatever the OLCC does.

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    1. Depending on the type of liquor license the establishment has they can be required to ID anybody who appears below 26 just for being inside.

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  3. Yeah, yeah. This is all fine and good, but what about my state issued temporary ID. I have to go through an absurdly long waiting period to get my new drivers license and in the mean time I'm being turned away from places for having a legitimate photo ID issued by the Oregon Department of Motor Vehicles.

    When did this become official policy? Why isn't this in your blog? It's totally outrageous that my ID is good enough for the police but the OLCC deems it too easy to replicate.

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    1. Your argument about turnaround time of DMV is hyperboly.

      Oregon ID cards and drivers licenses are mailed within three days of issuance. Your temp ID issued by DMV does not have to be accepted for alcohol sales, as it is not a secure document. Average waiting times at most Oregon DMV offices is seldom more than 30 minutes from the time you walk in and take a number until your number is called.

      These are (and always have been) rules set up by the OLCC. The police have other ways of verifying your temp license is valid. Your server does not and always has the option of not accepting it.

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    2. Your state-issued temporary ID is acceptable as stand-alone ID.

      Some businesses may have their own stricter policies, so they may ask for another piece of ID in addition to the temporary ID.

      We have information posted on our Web site to help businesses understand the new driver license and ID cards:
      www.oregon.gov/OLCC/docs/interim_id_info_for_licensees_rev.pdf

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  4. Your state-issued temporary ID is acceptable as stand-alone ID.

    Some businesses may have their own stricter policies, so they may ask for another piece of ID in addition to the temporary ID.

    We have information posted on our Web site to help businesses understand the new driver license and ID cards:
    www.oregon.gov/OLCC/docs/interim_id_info_for_licensees_rev.pdf

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  5. Does a Canadian driver's license qualify as valid ID in Oregon? I've never had a problem showing it in Oregon until recently when a server turned my party and I away. She said that she could only accept state ID or a passport and that this was state law.

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  6. The acceptable forms of ID for Oregon are: a valid state driver license with a photo; a valid DMV ID card with photo, name, date of birth & physical description from any state; a valid passport or a valid U.S. military ID card.

    Some businesses even have stricter policies than what the state requires.

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    Replies
    1. You never answered the question... Yes OR No?

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    2. Yes they did. A valid STATE ID, not a Canadian driver's license.

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  7. Once again, OLC proves it does not have the public's best interest in mind. You spend millions of our tax dollars on enforcing anti-American laws (impeding my right to a pursuit of happiness) and create fake laws (ie. separation of beer and vodka in a store??) so you can harass and fine innocent business owners and now you are spending more money promoting programs that are proven to be wrong (campaigning to curb youth drinking). Several independent studies show that children who drink moderately when in their early teens and even small amounts as children are far less likely to develop drinking problems later in life. Look at Europe, for example. They allow very young kids to drink wine with dsinner and they have a fraction of the alcohol related problems of the US. And you force people to make their children not drink in the safety of their own homes. Completely ass-backwards. (Also, making liquor stores close early so people are forced to drive to bars for alcohol creates more people drinking and driving, does it not).

    OLC is clearly run by the Mafia and it needs to be eliminated. Millions of tax dollars spent on corrupt OLC executives with no tangible results. It should be illegal to prevent people from expressing their right to a pursuit of happiness (ie. drinking and drugs).

    Government is always passing laws that are unfounded by science (ie. hands-free cell phones are proven to be more dangerous than hand-held).
    Please do some research before you shove your retarded laws down our throats.

    A concerned American.

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  8. Two questions, Can I use a permanent residence card as a form of ID to enter a bar? It contains my photo, name, birthdate, expiration date, the day since when I became a resident of the US and the country I was originally from but no signature. I do not have a bank card or passport yet but I do have a social security card. Would that be a second form of ID if asked?

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  9. Current law states that the only acceptable forms of ID for Oregon are: a valid state driver license with a photo; a valid DMV ID card with photo, name, date of birth & physical description from any state; a valid passport or a valid U.S. military ID card (Oregon Revised Statute 471.130).

    Social Security cards generally wouldn't qualify as a second form of ID because they don't have a photo, etc.

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  10. If you work in a retail environment & ask for ID, and the person who does not have it, claims to be 21(no wallet or alternative ID), and the person they are with claims to be their spouse and is paying for the alcohol, can that transaction proceed?
    Do you have to receive ID once you ask for it and then have to refuse the sale if they don't have it or is it okay to receive ID from another person who will pay?
    Also, if a group of 4 younger looking folks come to the checkstand with a case of beer, you ask for all ID's and only one of them is 21, can you still sell to that individual?

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  11. I wasn't able to get wine from the store because my State ID is expired and I only have my Green card, eventhough it shows my Date of Birth in there. Isn't it the only reason why they check the ID, to prove that you are at a legal age to buy a liquor???

    They should revise the list of acceptable ID's and add the Green Card (Permanent Resident CArd)! Coz some idiots just is not wise enough to understand the reason why they check for ID's...

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  12. I have to agree that the OLCC really needs to revise their list of acceptable ID cards and add the Legal Residence Card. Is the OLCC not aware what it takes to get a green card including proof of birth certificate, letters of good conduct, HIV test, US Federal background check and additional background check from respected country, informational interview etc. and yet you can't get a beer in Oregon? I mean really? I couldn't be anymore confused. So someone could be using a incredibly dodgy fake passport from Djibouti, which an Oregon bartender would have absolute no experience with and hey, that's valid, but not a US Government issued Legal residency card with all of the biographical information required, picture ID and fancy holograms that no one could ever fake. Who can I contact to really share my complaint and make a change, because this is just ridiculous.

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  13. I have to agree that the OLCC really needs to revise their list of acceptable ID cards and add the Legal Residence Card. Is the OLCC not aware what it takes to get a green card including proof of birth certificate, letters of good conduct, HIV test, US Federal background check and additional background check from respected country, informational interview etc. and yet you can't get a beer in Oregon? I mean really? I couldn't be anymore confused. So someone could be using a incredibly dodgy fake passport from Djibouti, which an Oregon bartender would have absolute no experience with and hey, that's valid, but not a US Government issued Legal residency card with all of the biographical information required, picture ID and fancy holograms that no one could ever fake. Who can I contact to really share my complaint and make a change, because this is just ridiculous.

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    Replies
    1. And what is preventing you from spending the extra time to go get a VALID state ID then? Quit pissin and moaning about not being treated fair about a Green card. Quit being lazy and go get a valid ID. If you don't have any thing to hide, then what is the issue?

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  14. Juan,
    The types of acceptable ID are in statute, so the OLCC does not have the authority to make changes without legislative action. You can contact your legislator to voice your concerns to see if this is something that can be addressed in the next legislative session in 2011.

    We really appreciate your input - you make some very good points. It's definitely something that deserves further discussion.

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  15. Can you clarify what is meant by a valid passport? I noticed that the Oregon DMV accepts U.S. passports that have expired no more than 5 years as "Proof of Your Legal Presence, Identity and Date of Birth":

    http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/DMV/driverid/idproof.shtml#legal_presence


    "A valid U.S. Passport, Passport Card or Emergency Passport expired no more than 5 years; or"

    Is the same true for OLCC ID requirements?

    Thanks!

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  16. Funkiwan:
    Driver licenses, identification cards, military identification, and passports would have to be current to be acceptable.

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  17. I was recently at Pastini on Broadway and both my wife and I presented military IDs and the server said they do not accept military IDs. What? So after questioning him he called over his manager who said they don't accept them because it is not in their "book" so as to know what a real one is supposed to look like. Isn't this illegal, to not accept a valid form of ID?

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  18. Jesus, businesses can have stricter requirements than those established by the OLCC. Sometimes a business might ask for a second piece of ID, for example. Some may not be familiar with military ID as it is not included in most ID checking manuals.

    Businesses always have the right to refuse service if they aren't sure if the person is of legal age.

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  19. Hi, I wasn't allowed into a downtown Eugene club, The District, last nite becasue the bouncer said that and I quote "OLCC regulations state that an active duty dependent ID is not a valid form of ID." Since when is this true? Iam both an ex service member and now a military dependent, and ONLY my dependent ID has my date of birth on it! My service member one does not for security reasons! I have also been a bartender for the past 10 yrs and taken the OLCC test a few times, so my question is...did OLCC changes their rules? Or was this bouncer just being a jerk?

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  20. Anonymous - nothing has changed for acceptable ID. This is actually a state law set forth by the Oregon Legislature, not an OLCC rule.

    Under Oregon law, the only acceptable forms of stand-alone ID are: a valid state driver license with a photo, a valid DMV ID card with photo, name, date of birth, and physical description from any state,a valid passport,a valid United States military ID card. (ORS 471.130)

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  21. my friend and i went into a dive bar last night. His dog had slightly chewed the corner of his ID but his photo is perfectly visible as well as all his information, DOB and what not. One of the men working there came straight up to us and asked for our ID and turned my friend down. He is thirty years old and has been using his ID with the slightly chewed corner for 6 months without problems. Would this fall into the business having their own set of rules? Or should we have asked for a 2nd opinion from another bartender? If ID is slightly damaged is it automatically not acceptable?

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  22. Annie - We instruct licensees, permittees and clerks if they have any doubt about the integrity of the identification presented to them, they should to refuse the sell of alcohol. The law states that if a person purchasing alcohol appears under the age of 26, they are required by law to have their ID checked. However, some businesses have a policies they follow that are more strict than the Oregon law.

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  23. I am a server. If I personally know that a person is over the age of 21 but they don't have their id

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  24. Anonymous...to answer your question, ORS 471.130 states that all licensees and permittees of the OLCC, before selling or serving alcoholic liquor to any person about whom there is any reasonable doubt of the person's having reached 21 years of age, shall require such person to produce one of the acceptable forms of identification: 1. Valid state driver's license with a photo; 2. A valid DMV ID card with photo, name, date of birth, & physical description from any state; 3. A valid passport; 4. A valid US military ID card. Reasonable doubt exists if the person appears under the age of 26. If a person appears under the age of 26, even though they are over 21, they are required to produce identification if asked when they purchase alcohol.

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  25. That answers my question perfectly. Now what about midnight birthdays? They are technically 21 years of age at midnight, but I have heard of places/servers making people wait until the next business day.. And last question, why doesn't the olcc do their own testing for permits? It seems to me like a waste of money to outsource and honestly, the test I took was a joke. I didn't read any of the material and I got a 98% and I'm assuming I just misread the question I got wrong. It seems to me like it wouldn't be hard to come by the resources to do testing yourself, and in that case you wouuld also be educating the people who take the test, or so I would hope...

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  26. When the legislature first passed mandatory alcohol server education in 1987, the legislature set it up so that the classes and tests would be offered by the private sector. The OLCC would develop the course curriculum and tests, develop the technical requirements and experience that a provider and instructor would need to meet in order to be certified to teach the class, and oversee all providers and instructors by regularly monitoring their classes. To help and assist with these tasks, the legislature also mandated that the OLCC Alcohol Server Education (ASE) Program form an Advisory Committee made up of persons from the State Police, District Attorney's Association, Oregon Health Authority. Department of Transportation, a non-profit organization (trying to reduce the incidence of drunk driving), an alcohol service permittee, up to three associations representing retail licensees, and two from insurance companies. ASE Advisory Committee assists the ASE staff in the development of teaching standards, curriculum and training materials and revisions, review of the test and test question updates, and provider/instructor certification standards. This committee works with staff to keep the curriculum current and to consider other relevant alcohol related information that anyone who works in the alcohol hospitality industry would find helpful in doing their job.

    The legislature set it up this way in part to keep costs down and the operating budget of the OLCC from going up. If the OLCC staff taught the classes and administered the tests, it could have required a substantial increase in new positions at the OLCC to teach the classes around the state which would have been a sharp increase to the operating budget. A few years ago there were over 20 providers and 40 instructors approved by the OLCC teaching throughout the state. There are slightly fewer now, but for the OLCC to offer comparable state-wide coverage would require a significant increase to its budget and staff. In many ways the current system is quite cost effective.

    As for the test, there has been discussion over the years about making the test harder, but the test was never meant to filter people out of the hospitality industry. It was meant to be a learning tool and to gauge whether the student understood the basic liquor laws, how to recognize visible intoxication, how to cut off alcohol service off to a customer who has become visibly intoxicated, how to properly check ID and recognize false ID, and how to refuse service to minors.

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  27. I understand why the state has a list of of only 4 acceptable forms of ID. Sellers and servers across this state can not be expected to be familiar with 50 kinds of acceptable ID cards. I worked the doors of bars and clubs for many years, and as an employee, you are looking out for the welfare and liabilities of your establishment. It really comes down to judgement calls. I have denied people who were pretty clearly over 21, but did not look over 26, who did not have ID. I have sent people to jail for having proper ID that was not theirs. I agree that other forms of ID should be allowed, such as a concealed handgun license. This is a form of ID that is issued only after a federal background check and finger printing. But, every county issues their own, and there is not book out there to compare the ID to like there is for state ID's. Long story short, always remember that Oregon's liquor laws are some of the strictest in the nation, and businesses are trying to protect themselves. If you don't like it, go get the right ID card.

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    1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  28. I'm ok with AVE where they only record DL # and DOB which the police can pull full records from, but places that use ID check system that downloads the entire data from the license and catalog them really gets under my skin. Name, address, vitals, DOB, DL # and EVERYTHING.

    Law considers DL number as non-public record and they have no right archiving personal identifiable private information without specific consent.

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  29. I am a Canadian down for training and was refused service in Portland due to only being able to produce a current British Columbia DL not a passport. Is this correct?

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  30. It's extremely aggravating that an expired Oregon Driver's license isn't accepted. OLCC reps here claim "we can't change the law" and I agree, but the law doesn't state anything about this.

    http://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/471.130

    The law is about not serving alcohol to minors, not about nitpicking someone who goes out on their birthday only to realize their license is expired.

    The OLCC should either make their guidelines more in line with the actual statute, or clarify to restaurant and bar owners what the requirements actually are. Simply repeating "some places can have stricter rules" is a cop-out. They have stricter rules precisely because they don't understand what the real rules are and therefore err on the side of safety.

    When are we going to get a ballot measure to eliminate the OLCC once and for all? The entire program is a waste of tax money and is more-or-less a subsidy for liquor stores. If an adult wants to purchase alcohol, they should be able to do it in a grocery store, like most other states. We're not Mormon and the prohibition is over. Stop living in the past.

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  31. @Cliff Wells,
    While ORS 471.130 does not specifically state that an ID needs to be valid, an ID that is expired makes the ID not valid. Licensees, permittees and their employees are trained through alcohol server education and identification training classes, that if a license is expired - it is not valid.

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  32. If I have an expired license and no other form of ID can I still drink at my own residence and/or my friends' residence?

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  33. My stepson has been in Portland for one mo, he does not carry his passport because he was advised by his home country Scotland not to in case he should loose it, he has had no problem at every establishment they have taken his UK drivers license is this acceptable or not? He was just turned away from an establishment that he had already been to saying he had to show his passport, he did have a student ID as well with photo why wouldn't these two forms of ID be accepted? The Uk license is impenetrable and is obvious when you look at it!

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  34. Shannon,
    The word "state" in ORS 471.130(1)(b) would be interpreted to include driver's licenses issued by US territories and states/provinces of foreign countries including Canada and Mexico. However, if the business can't determine from the license the person's age or whether the ID is a valid license, they should require another form of ID such as a passport. There are establishments however, that as a matter of policy, will not accept the out of country ID.

    I hope that helps.

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  35. I have now turned down two Concealed Carry Permits as forms of ID in as many days. Both times I was met with comments about it being a valid form of ID. I know what the law says and I know what's acceptable, so I know I am not wrong. I'd bet my OLCC card on it.

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  36. I had a lady come into the restaurant and provide a concealed handgun license to me as her only form of ID. I didn't accept it as a valid form. She threw a fit and cussed at me saying that it was a Oregon state issued ID and would work. Who's in the wrong here?

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  37. Regarding concealed handgun licenses as ID....

    ORS 471.130(e) lists as one of the authorized types of ID a identification card "issued by a state" that contains certain specified information. Typically, this is a non-driver ID card issued by a state DMV. The terms "issued" by a state" do not include cards issued by entities other than the state. According to ORS 166.291, a concealed handgun license is issued by the county sheriff. A license issued by the county sheriff's office does not qualify as a type of ID in ORS 471.130(e) because it is not issued by the state.

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  38. Is a passport card an acceptable form of ID? I was told it must be a passport book and not a card.

    I would think it would be but I heard that it has to be a passport book and that OLCC wont accept the card as I.D.

    If it is not can you explain why?

    If you can clarify this rule I would appreciate it.

    Thanks

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  39. Hi, I have a question about confiscating false IDs. I was reading through my old (2004) OLCC handbook and I read that the OLCC does not recommend confiscating false IDs. I was under the impression that we are legally supposed to confiscate them so that they could not be used again in a different bar. I try to remember to confiscate IDs that I think are false (although usually I forget and just hand it back to them and tell them to leave), but if it is not recommended that I do so I will stop doing this.

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  40. Hi, I have a question about confiscating false IDs. I was reading through my old (2004) OLCC handbook and I read that the OLCC does not recommend confiscating false IDs. I was under the impression that we are legally supposed to confiscate them so that they could not be used again in a different bar. I try to remember to confiscate IDs that I think are false (although usually I forget and just hand it back to them and tell them to leave), but if it is not recommended that I do so I will stop doing this.

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    Replies
    1. The main objective is to refuse the sale and to keep alcohol out of the hands of minors. Because there is a risk involved by attempting to keep the false identification, OLCC does not advise employees to keep the false identification. If employees decide to keep the false identification, they should turn it over to OLCC or local law enforcement. Keeping the false identification is a business decision and the element of risk should be considered (for example: If I keep the identification, do I feel threatened?)

      High Priority ID Checking
      The OLCC has a program called the High Priority ID Checking Program in which inspectors identify and offer assistance in checking ID's to licensees that attract large numbers of young patrons. Inspectors and licensees determine the best days and times to conduct this program. Inspectors train the licensee and their employees by assisting them in checking the ID of young appearing persons attempting entry into a premises or attempting purchases of alcohol. Inspectors show the licensee and employees how to detect and seize improper identifications. Inspectors will issue criminal citations for the appropriate charge(s) when apprehending minors with illegal identification. **If you're interested in this program, you can contact your local OLCC office for more information.

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  41. I understand that establishments can have stricter ID requirements. I was caught off guard while trying to buy at market in downtown Portland. I was told that I had to have an "Downtown ID" that verifies that I live downtown. Is this a state issued ID? Are there special rules for downtown folks? I've never heard of this.

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  42. Anonymous - you're right. There is no such thing as "downtown ID". If you'd like to give us more information (name of market, time of day, etc.), we'd be happy to look into this.

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  43. More on the "Downtown ID". This was at Peterson's market on SW 2nd & Yamhill at about 8:15 am. Please don't take my comment as a complaint. I had assumed that it was a program to help discourage the homeless from hanging out down there.

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  44. I work in a lottery establishment in Oregon. We are told that everyone is requiered to have I'd to be in the store by law. I have heard of people being fined for customers not having any/expired ID. Is there any fine or law that prohibits people without any ID from entering a bar?

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    1. Oregon law states a person who appears to be under the age of 26 is required to have their identification checked prior to being sold or served alcoholic beverages or be in a premises or an area of the a premises that is normally prohibited to minors. If you appear to be under the age of 26 years of age, you would be required to have your identification on you. However, some businesses have policies that are more strict than the Oregon law and may require all patrons to show a valid form of identification.

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  45. If someone is 30 and looks the age of 26-30 and the server decides not to card the patron, what would happen if an OLCC agent or the Police came in and requested an ID from the patron and they don't have one?

    We are in the same boat, we have been checking everyone's ID including those that are 50 to 60 years old. Some have expired ID's and I would think it should be fine for them to drink and be in the establishment.

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  46. I have no ID or drivers license. I can just use my passport to get a beer at the nearest gas station?

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    Replies
    1. Yes, your passport qualifies as valid ID.

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  47. What is the legal time you are technically 21 in Oregon? Is it 12:01am on your 21st birthday? Or do you have to wait till 8am to be legally allowed to enter a bar like in some states?

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    Replies
    1. There are no specific laws regarding the time you turn legally 21, just your date of birth. So yes, you could go into a bar at 12:01 am on your 21st birthday...however, some establishments have their own policies which may not allow that.

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  48. I am just unsure on who we are to card if there is a group of people together. I was just informed from my job that we can only card one person under 40 not the whole group.
    It is their decision.
    Is this true and could i get in trouble?

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  49. upon checking an pass port does it have to have a home land security stamp to be valid i have seen a lot of mexico pass ports and know they are easy to purchase without a stamp

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  50. Is a passport card the same as a passport in the eyes of the OLCC?

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  51. If a doorman/store clerk claims that the ID used is fake, are they legally allowed to confiscate the ID in question? If so, under what law can this be found?

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  52. First off, this is a great blog. Thanks for providing it. I hope it's still active.

    I'm 46 years old and tried to enter a club to see a show at Roseland Theater tonight only to discover my OR drivers license expired 2 months ago. Surely I look over 26 and I'm not actually asking to be served alcohol simply by entering the building. I wasn't allowed to enter. Poking around online I saw there is something called a "Statement of Age" through the OLCC. Can you tell me more about why I wasn't allowed in the club? Can you also explain when a Statement of Age could be used? Could I have brought it back to the club and legally be allowed in?

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  53. While waiting for my certified copy of my birth certificate to arrive so I can renew my driver's license that expires in two days, I was issued a temporary permit for driving. Is this acceptable identification at bars and/or restaurants? Of course, it expires on my birthday and the next day, friends want to take me out for drinks. I'm 36 years old, this is frustrating.

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  54. I was just denied service at a bar in central oregon because when I turned 24 last week my id expired. Their reasoning was that I need a valid license to be served but the law states that i need only be 21. So if I am obviously older than 21 based on 3 different forms of identification i cannot purchase alcohol because "legally" i do not have a valid drivers license. So as far as olcc is concerned as long as you are 16 years of age and can drive you can purchase alcohol? Cant find any specific information on this. Does olcc contradict federal law in this scenario?

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    1. Most places won't accept expired ID of any form. However, I'm not sure why you weren't served if you had other forms of valid ID. Here's a link to the Oregon law: https://www.oregonlegislature.gov/bills_laws/lawsstatutes/2013ors471.html

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  55. is it legal to serve one person a large pitcher of beer?

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    1. Yes, although many establishments probably have policies against this.

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  56. I WAS JUST DEMANDED TO BE CARDED AT RITE AIDE IN DALLAS ORE BECAUSE I CAME IN WITH SOMEONE WHO WAS BUYING BEER, OF COURSE I REFUSED, HAD A DISCUSSION ABOUT IT, AND WAS TOLD THE STATE LAW WAS, ANYONE WHO CAME IN TOGETHER HAD TO BE CARDED IF ONE WAS BUYING LIQUOR, MY WARNING FLAGS ABOUT ABSUDRITY FLEW UP, THUS THE NEARLY INTENSE CONVERSATION. IS THAT THE LAW OR WAS I BEING DIPSYDOODLED?

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    1. You're correct. State law only requires that the person who is purchasing the alcohol is 21. Some stores have stricter policies though, which may be the case in your situation.

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  57. I went to a liquor store with all my buddies that were riding with me. Walked out the store and in to the my car. OLCC blocks me in with their car like they are the police. Got out and came to my car and asked for all our ID s after we left the Liquor store. Do they have the right to do that????

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    1. Can you give me a little more information? Where and when did this happen?

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