Friday, November 4, 2011

Oregon is a good state for local distillers

Remember the 70’s when Oregon wineries were just getting their foothold in the market?  And do you recall the boom of the Oregon brewers back in the 90’s? Now, the prosperity of Oregon entrepreneurs is shining on the distillery industry. 
                                         
OLCC has licensed more than 40 Oregon distilleries and the number is growing. Our unique Oregon culture promotes a positive environment for craft distilleries. For example, a distillery license in Oregon costs only $100. Another benefit is that distillers do not have to "buy shelf space" to get their product into stores. Because the OLCC treats all products equally – there are no extra fees that local distillers have to pay to get their products on the shelves of liquor stores.

The OLCC warehouse has a unique system for getting new and local products into the market. We refer to this area as “Re-pack.” The OLCC warehouse will break up a full case of liquor to allow stores to place partial case orders. Liquor stores don't need to fill their stock rooms with a full case of each product. They can order just one or two bottles to see how well it sells.   

There have been several recent law changes that benefit Oregon distillers. Distillers can now offer tastings (small samples of product), or sell their products by the glass at a restaurant at their distillery or another location. Another law allows distilled spirits tastings at liquor stores to now include mixers – which helps customers know how they would use the product at home. 

Oregon distillers can also apply to be "distillery agents" so that they can sell their product from the distillery or tasting room. Over half the distilleries in Oregon are also distillery agents.

The OLCC takes pride in helping to establish responsible businesses in our state, and in helping Oregon become a leader in the nation for the burgeoning craft distillery industry.

2 comments:

  1. Until COSTCO changes distribution laws. The washington i-1183 allows the grocery chains to go directly to the distillers and purchase liquor. The groceriers can not carry the diversity and quantity that the state liquor stores so the small distillers will be cut out. how many current liquor stores are within blocks of a large grocery store? you will be ouot of business as soon as COSTCO changes the law. if you dont think so do nothing and watch what happens in Washington. your stores, distributors, distillers and state income are on the target list. make the laws stronger create a coalition now or someone will do it for you and not in your favor.

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  2. Costco hasn't stopped independent liquor stores in other states. Why is suddenly going to happen in Washington?

    Freedom for adults to choose. Always.

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